Look with thy mind, not thine eyes

Dear Reader,

Hey, there! Thanks for visiting my blog and reading my post. And if you express it by pressing the Like button into the bargain, my spirit will surely be uplifted from the rut of my so-called life. If you are further intrigued by my e-book recently published on Amazon Kindle and drop just a few lines of your thoughts about the story upon reading, I will feel like a millionaire without the actual sort of money in my bank account.

Well, it’s been two weeks or so since I published the e-book on Kindle, but a reception reminds me of the frightfully cold winter of New York City I have experienced. No one seems to read even the first page thereof, according to my Kindle Direct stats. Inevitably, a good book will find its readers without eye-catching promotions or pitiful solicitations for readership based on sympathy. But honestly, I don’t feel comfortable canvassing readership by either of the means. And yet, since I am a girl of contrasts, my ambition for full recognition of my work refuses to be humble and thus commands my unwilling spirit to write this letter to you.

It’s only 57 pages in total, so the book won’t take much of your precious time. And I must admit that the formatting of the text may seem obtrusively arcane and dense, but Reader, look not with thine eye but with thy mind. The story is worth reading amid flotsam and jetsam of textual wonderland. Just click on the below book cover with one touch of your fingertip, and it will lead you to the place where the story begins via wondrous witchcraft. Many thanks for reading with my whole heart!

Best, Stephanie 

 

 

4 thoughts on “Look with thy mind, not thine eyes

  1. Veronica

    I have thoroughly enjoyed the preview of your book, Stephanie! To quote your own eloquent passage, ”you are indeed a good writer who writes the language of the heart and the mind”! 👏

    Surprisingly, just like Judy, I have been waking up at precisely 3:00 a.m. for the last week! I wonder whether we share the same existential crisis, or if it’s the consequence of our solipsistic perception of the world?

    I loved that you pointed out Tolstoy’s grammatical struggles – reading Anna Karenina, I’ve stumbled on many words, finding unlikely sentence constructions…

    You’ve managed to take the best out of Tolstoy by crafting intense inner monologue!

    Once my credit card is renewed, I promise to was it in full. ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. Stephanie Suh Post author

    O, my dear Veronica! To quote Shakespeare, I can make no other answer but thank you and thank you 🥺🥰 I am very happy that you find my story intriguing. It’s my first time to write a fiction because I was afraid of being a public laughing stock… and yes, I still wake up at 3:00 am, which is said to be when witches and ghosts are roaming and confabulating. Also, the two crows of Odin called memory and thought are flying over the world to tell what they see and think about the world to their master during the day. I think we share the same existential crisis… which is actually our magical power! We may be faeries! ⭐️✨

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