Posted in book review

‘Hittites: A History From Beginning to End’ by Hourly History – book review

Hittites: A History From Beginning to End by Hourly History
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The name Uriah always fascinated me from British Rock band Uriah Heep to the biblical Uriah, whose beautiful wife led him ultimately to death, willy-nilly, by King David infatuated with her sensuousness. When I learned that the ancestor of Uriahs was the founder of the Hittites race, being the great-grandson of Noah, the biblical patriarch, I had a Eureka moment. Consequently, I picked up this concise but comprehensive book on the Hittites to know a little more about the people whose founder had the great name.

Before the splendor of ancient Greek contributions to our human cultural progress as a collective enterprise, there was the forgotten but enduring legacy of the Hittites, the mysterious Indo-European trailblazers of civilizations at the crossroads of the East and the West in the vast plain of modern-day Turkey. The Hittites were an integral people to solve the mystery of mythological and biblical events anchored in the real world, thus dissolving fact and legend into one another like a genie from an empire that vanished into the dunes of time and comes alive in the calling. The calling of these mysteriously vanished people came first from British Reverends Archibald Henry Sayce and William Wright in the early 19th century. They discovered the artifacts and sites of the Hittites. Their discovery led to more remarkable discoveries. During the middle Bronze age and Iron age, the Hittites were the first to utilize iron from the region of present Armenia to craft tools and weapons. Also, the Hittites were deft at commerce, developing the city of Carchemish as an ancient mercantile hubbub in which they imported products from Phoenicia and exported them to Assyria (the North) and Babylon (the South) in Mesopotamia. In this fabulous ancient city, Israelites of the Old Testament acted as intermediaries in trade between Egyptians for exporting horses and chariots and the Hittites for importing them.

Like all those famous entertainers who sparkled then lost the lusters, the Hittites as a collective empire fell from splendor gradually by outside forces: some pointed the fingers at the Sea People, while the others blamed a certain barbarous Kaska people. But, perhaps, such clandestine ending of the Hittites is what makes them formidably alluring and mysteriously fascinating, blurring the boundary of fact and legend. Suppose you are keen on the history of ancient civilizations other than Greece and Egypt. In that case, this elegant primer for the history of the Hittites will equip you with fundamental knowledge enough to whet your craving for more and more profound knowledge about the Hittites.



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Posted in Poetry

the castle east of the sun west of the moon

She sits under the shades of willow
Where she came from, no one cares
The castle East of the Sun West of the Moon.

Then the leaves of the tree whisper to her ears
“Ride on the wings of the Four Winds therefrom
The Castle East of the Sun West of the Moon.”

She speaks in the language of the wind, Aeolian
And calls for the Four Winds to carry her home
The Castle East of the Sun the West of the Moon.

First East wind comes, she rides on his wings anon,
West Wind, South Wind, and to North Wind reaching
The Castle East of the Sun West of the Moon.

Ere the Sun goes west and the Moon comes east
Or she will never get to her beloved home
The Castle East of the Sun West of the Moon.

Posted in Poetry

the golden apples

Maidens of the Evening Star, Daughters of Atlas
Goddesses of the Evening, Children of Nyx
Live far away from here beyond glorious oceans
On the boundary of the Night encircled by stars
with pales hues of sunshine in the land of the Hesperides;


Mirth and music spring from the land of the Hesperides
Where they tend a garden of divine golden apples
Guarded by the faithful dragon Ladon with mighty wings
Swooping four winds, bellowing a crescendo of flames
That envelope the circle of divine parameter against the mortals
Till the impetuous half-man, half-god Hercules darts an arrow
Dipped in the blood of Hydra piercing the heart that dies in sorrow
shedding the tears for love for his goddesses, the Hesperides;


They mourn for the death of their beloved Ladon, whose blood flows
From the still warm heart and meets with tears from the diamond eyes;
And the gods of Olympus bring the slain dragon among the stars
And give him a house of his own named Draco where he can watch always
Over the garden of golden apples in his beloved land of the Hesperides.

Posted in Poetry

the wizard of rain

The wizard of rain, the knight of nature,
Goes to the hill in the twilight of the dawn
With a falcon sitting on his right shoulder
And rising to the virgin sky before a new sun
in search of the meadow where a moon was drawn.

The wizard of rain, the collector of wonder,
Gathers dewdrops from the fresh frost of grass
Into a crystal bottle and reads his grimoire
As the falcon flaps his wings in the air
And brings the forces of nature in abundance.

The wizard of rain, the wondrous sorcerer,
Calls the names of gods, demons, and angels
Wielding his wand in a symphony of nature
Amid the swaying leaves of the grass and trees,
All in harmony bringing rains from the sky.

Posted in Poetry

Draw the Moon

The sky is howling in the twilight

As the chariot of the moon flies;

She hears her fate that she wants not

Thru the rustling leaves and grass

Swaying in the wind of the chariot

And draws the moon from the seat

To take back her unwanted future.