Posted in Poetry

Polaris

Remember, when you see the North Star
On a high cold night drifting away at sea,
Your destiny isn’t doomed altogether
Even the spell on your life fades away;
Hope leads the path most brilliantly,
Humor cheers a sailing most pleasingly,
And tomorrow is always a new adventure;
No fortune’s malice can cover the Polaris
Nor can sorrow dim the diamond light
With heart even for the fate unkind ever.

Posted in Poetry

Wanderlust

For one hundred and twenty years
Trapped in the maze of this mirage,
Where I began, I can go back never;
Here I stand and face the bare fate
Or is it nothing but the illusion ever?

As Aurora releases the first dewdrop,
I go high over, down under
From one end of the horizon to the other
Across the five continents and six oceans
Above the heavens, below the abyss
Far into the milky ways and back to earth
with the jewel of hope in beatitude.

Posted in Poetry

at the sea

I have seen the insidious sea
Lull the children of the shore
With the sweet aeolian lullaby
And the pretty nymphs appear
From the bottom of the ocean
To bring them into the palace
Where their father, Poseidon
Keeps the souls of the sea
As is his mighty brother Zeus
For the world above and beyond;
Woe betides those who forego
The fates of the young souls,
For their grandfather, whose eyes
See the insidious machination
Fascinate the innocent hearts
In the whirlpool of rapid waves!
The old man’s fury is greater
Than the furious god of the sea;
He dives into the angry waters,
Fighting against the god in spades
With his bare arms cutting the waves
Like swords that could kill ghosts
And wins of his two grandchildren;
From the god whose wrath sees
No end until it grows the waves
Into the myrmidons of madness
And carries the old man into the abyss.

P.S.: This poem is based on my reading of a newspaper article that a sixty-one-year-old British grandfather died while trying to save his two grandchildren, aged seven and ten, in the sea off the island of Crete, Greece. The man got into the sea, fighting with the rapid, treacherous waves like Caligula, who declared war on the sea, whipping the waves furiously to invade Britain. Finally, his grandchildren got out safely, but alas, the old man was engulfed by the wrath of furious waves and drawn to the bottom of the sea. I could not just forego my feelings upon reading the story with poetic elements that also bring me the mythological image of Laocoon, the Trojan priest punished by Poseidon who sent the great serpent engulfing him and his two young sons for his discovering the Greek ruse about the wooden Trojan horse. Hence this little poem is in memory of the brave and loving grandfather.

Posted in book review

‘Hittites: A History From Beginning to End’ by Hourly History – book review

Hittites: A History From Beginning to End by Hourly History
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The name Uriah always fascinated me from British Rock band Uriah Heep to the biblical Uriah, whose beautiful wife led him ultimately to death, willy-nilly, by King David infatuated with her sensuousness. When I learned that the ancestor of Uriahs was the founder of the Hittites race, being the great-grandson of Noah, the biblical patriarch, I had a Eureka moment. Consequently, I picked up this concise but comprehensive book on the Hittites to know a little more about the people whose founder had the great name.

Before the splendor of ancient Greek contributions to our human cultural progress as a collective enterprise, there was the forgotten but enduring legacy of the Hittites, the mysterious Indo-European trailblazers of civilizations at the crossroads of the East and the West in the vast plain of modern-day Turkey. The Hittites were an integral people to solve the mystery of mythological and biblical events anchored in the real world, thus dissolving fact and legend into one another like a genie from an empire that vanished into the dunes of time and comes alive in the calling. The calling of these mysteriously vanished people came first from British Reverends Archibald Henry Sayce and William Wright in the early 19th century. They discovered the artifacts and sites of the Hittites. Their discovery led to more remarkable discoveries. During the middle Bronze age and Iron age, the Hittites were the first to utilize iron from the region of present Armenia to craft tools and weapons. Also, the Hittites were deft at commerce, developing the city of Carchemish as an ancient mercantile hubbub in which they imported products from Phoenicia and exported them to Assyria (the North) and Babylon (the South) in Mesopotamia. In this fabulous ancient city, Israelites of the Old Testament acted as intermediaries in trade between Egyptians for exporting horses and chariots and the Hittites for importing them.

Like all those famous entertainers who sparkled then lost the lusters, the Hittites as a collective empire fell from splendor gradually by outside forces: some pointed the fingers at the Sea People, while the others blamed a certain barbarous Kaska people. But, perhaps, such clandestine ending of the Hittites is what makes them formidably alluring and mysteriously fascinating, blurring the boundary of fact and legend. Suppose you are keen on the history of ancient civilizations other than Greece and Egypt. In that case, this elegant primer for the history of the Hittites will equip you with fundamental knowledge enough to whet your craving for more and more profound knowledge about the Hittites.



View all my reviews

Posted in Poetry

the castle east of the sun west of the moon

She sits under the shades of willow
Where she came from, no one cares
The castle East of the Sun West of the Moon.

Then the leaves of the tree whisper to her ears
“Ride on the wings of the Four Winds therefrom
The Castle East of the Sun West of the Moon.”

She speaks in the language of the wind, Aeolian
And calls for the Four Winds to carry her home
The Castle East of the Sun the West of the Moon.

First East wind comes, she rides on his wings anon,
West Wind, South Wind, and to North Wind reaching
The Castle East of the Sun West of the Moon.

Ere the Sun goes west and the Moon comes east
Or she will never get to her beloved home
The Castle East of the Sun West of the Moon.