Always on my mind

I am not a baby anymore
than you are a girl never;
The hours, minutes, seconds
we have traveled together
How could we have known
where we would be now
when I see you in my eyes
And me in your glass palace
reflecting the liquid dreams
forming the shapes of memories?
The shadows of melancholy
cast upon the liquid eyes
filled with emerald dreams
Will be cleared away soon
When your lucky star finds you
and the whole universe conspires
to rebel against the malice of gods.

a lie, yes a lie

No pain, no gain!
Who said that?
What a sadist!
Break the heart,
what do you want?
Blow the spirit,
does it come again?
Some may regenerate
like an inveterate clown
when some can’t take it
with the heartstrings pulled
tweaked, pinched, and torn
Till their souls refuse to stay
besieged, assaulted within.
So, never say once again
Pain is s necessary gambit
with stacks of aces hidden
because it simply isn’t
but a swaggering fiddlestick.

‘The Complete Book of Cat Names’ by Bob Eckstein

My rating: is 4 out of 5 stars.

T.S. Eliot, an admirer of the cat, advocates the importance of naming them in his Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats because cats are so individual that they defy asinine nominative determinism inadvertently assigned by humans. Suppose cats like the names they are called. In that case, they will turn their heads toward the resonance of the calls with inquisitive eyes full of curiosity that often turns into alacrity of adventure. In this witty and illustrious book, Eckstein agrees with Eliot and gives practical advice on naming cats ranging from ancient legacies to modern celebrities.

Toro, the Tiger

Eckstein provides a variety of ideas about cat names according to the guardians’ cultural inclinations, such as history, fine arts, and entertainment. For example, if you are keen on ancient history, consider the names like Cleopatra or Caesar. Picasso or Figaro if you love their paintings. How about Bono of U2? Whatever it may be, one thing is sure your cat loves it by responding to the name. According to a book I read about dogs written by a monk who specialized in dog training, it is advisable to give a gender-specific name to a dog. For example, if it is a female dog, the name should end with the -na suffix. Conversely, if it is a male dog, it should end with -no. Although the canine and the feline are different species, I always think it is convincingly good advice. Hence, I named my tabby cat Toro, derived from Tora, meaning a tigress in Japanese. Incidentally, my zodiac animal is Tiger, so I thought it would be apropos of him. Does Toro like his name? You bet.

Nero, being Nero

My black cat now has a new name, Nero, changed from Camille, the name he didn’t respond to. Initially, I thought about naming him Bono as suggested by Eckstein, not because I like U2 but because I suspected my newly adopted cat being a Bombay cat with his beautifully shiny and sleek ebony fur coat. So I tried it, but there was no response. Then I remembered the song “A Black Cat Named Nero,” I liked when I was a little child. The result was Nero materialized. What can I say? Cats are individuals.


I want to say this book is not only for readers with cats, but practically speaking, it isn’t. Any would-be cat owner or one who has just adopted a cat will find this book delightfully helpful in naming the cat. I have to say it reinforces me to change my second cat’s name from Camille to Nero. So when you call your cat, it should be the one only your cat has and likes it. You will know because your cat will meow. All cats are personal with stories to tell.